Patient Information

Clinical care and service to cancer patients are provided through Cleveland Clinic and University Hospitals Case Medical Center, the patient care components of the Case Comprehensive Cancer Center.

Clinical care and service to cancer patients are provided through Cleveland Clinic and University Hospitals Case Medical Center, the patient care components of the Case Comprehensive Cancer Center. Patients seeking treatment from a comprehensive cancer center have the benefit of access to a full range of services, from basic research information to advanced treatments and psychosocial and supportive care. Important aspects of this access include the opportunity to be part of clinical trials as well as being offered the latest cancer treatments.


Featured Clinical Trial

Linsitinib in Treating Patients With Asymptomatic or Mildly Symptomatic Metastatic Prostate Cancer

Barrett's esophagus is a change in the cells lininvg the esophagus, or swallowing tube, which is a forerunner of esophageal cancer. Patients with Barrett's have a 30 - 125 fold increased risk of developing esophageal cancer. Barrett's is closely linked with long-standing heartburn or GERD. About 10% of patients with long-standing GERD will develop Barrett's esophagus. Research by these investigators and others has shown that relatives of individuals with Barrett's esophagus and esophageal cancer have a higher rate of GERD and Barrett's. People who have had GERD symptoms for more than 5 years may be at risk for Barrett's esophagus and should discuss the possibility with their doctor. Symptoms include burning pain behind the breastbone, regurgitation, pain and difficulty swallowing. Some have only mild symptoms, or no symptoms. Investigators are continuing research sponsored by grants from the National Institutes of Health (NIH). Patients with Barrett's esophagus or esophageal cancer complete a questionnaire detailing GERD symptoms and family history. Relatives of those already involved in the study are also contacted to complete questionnaires and undergo screening. Using a very thin scope, they examine the esophagus to check for Barrett's. Blood samples from families with two or more affected members are being collected and now stored at the Rutgers University Cell and DNA Repository, which is supported by NIH. This repository will eventually help researchers from all over the country understand the genetic basis for these diseases. For any questions, call Wendy Brock, RN at University Hospitals of Cleveland at 216-844-3853 or Denise Buonocore Sassano, RN of the Cleveland Clinic at 216-445-0593.

Description:

This study is designed to determine whether there is an increased incidence of Barrett's esophagus or esophageal cancer in the relatives of persons with Barrett's esophagus or esophageal cancer. The Division of Gastroenterology is contacting siblings, children, and parents of patients with Barrett's esophagus or esophageal cancer, who have had symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) or heartburn. Using a very thin scope, we can examine the esophagus to check for Barrett's without the need for sedation. This procedure takes no more than 10 minutes.

Study Population:

Individuals with Barrett's esophagus or adenocarcenoma of the esophagus whose medical care is at the participating institutions, are referred from outside institutions, or who contact the participating institutions.

Criteria:

Participants should be parents or siblings of patients with Barrett's esophagus or esophageal cancer.

Contact:

For information or to register for screening in this trial please call HealthMatch at (216) 844-5000.

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